CHECK OUT Lydia Perakis! See her work on OCTOBER 27th: 8:00 pm, The Works studio

LYDIA PERAKIS

Lydia Perakis was born in Nashville, Tennessee and was raised in Crete, Greece. She is currently a senior at NYU-Tisch pursuing a Major in Dance and a Minor in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies. Lydia has worked as an Event Manager at the Center for Performance Research (Brooklyn) and as a Stage and House Manager at Soho Playhouse. She has been awarded with the June 2018 Tisch Initiative for Creative Research residency through Danspace’s Community Access program. During the residency, she collaborated with the set designer, Monique Muse, and the music composer, Ntu, and created her first evening length work, ESTIA, which was performed on June 9th, 2018. During the summer of 2018, Lydia travelled to Berlin and participated in the b12 festival, taking classes from Helder Seabra, Meg Stuart, Judith Sánchez Ruíz and Ayman Harper. She has also created several shorter works that have been performed at the Jack Crystal Theater, and has been a part of Jeremy Nelson’s art installation during the Art in Odd Places, 14th street Festival (2017).

Here are some of her views on her upcoming HATCH presentation!!

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

“Some of the struggles choreographers in NYC face is to balance performance logistics (such as finding studio space etc), while at the same time looking for creative and safe environments that nurture growth. This is why creating spaces where works in progress are presented and constructive feedback is given, is crucial. In addition, having a timeline and a show to prepare for, pushes the choreographer to set guidelines and short term goals for the creative process. In addition, it creates an opportunity to take a step back from the work and experience it in different spaces, with different viewers, and during different time periods. Choreographic works are living beings that adjust and adapt. Being able to present them throughout their eternal progress keeps them alive, feeds them, and flourishes them. I am a firm believer that works are always in progress and the only thing that changes is the pathway through which they progress, rather than essentially the material itself.” 

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

“Being in the studio with passionate and genuine individuals, who have kindness, joy and wisdom to share is something that always thrills me to create work. Exploring together and collaborating in works that bring us to uncomfortable and foreign places is a challenge that I strive for. Being open to share your perspective and thought process as an artist is crucial during the creative period and also the most rewarding part. Being able to see dancers invested in the work in more than a physical manner is what makes dance so exciting and essential.” 

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

“Epistrophe is a piece that explores questions regarding our perception of arcs in time, different life stages and our motivation and rush to the next stage; without really knowing what awaits us at the end of this arc. Taking the myth of the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, and exploring its importance as a metaphor and how it symbolically applies to many of our life decisions, helped us create this piece and physicalize the joy of the presence. Presenting this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC where time and perception of time as well as goals and accomplishment have really different meanings is important for us. We are hoping to hear feedback from people observing the work and incorporate them in the future. Opening up this conversation and understanding how different people experience similar concepts is what helps us progress as well as add different layers to it.” 

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

“What I mostly aspire is to create a safe environment for the performers where we can investigate complex questions, question our responses and perspectives and develop some form of critical thinking around social topics, which will be physicalized through the work. Many times, we find this investigation frustrating, but at the same time it works for us therapeutically living in this chaotic world. Doing the work can help us release that frustration and create for us a feeling of empowerment. This is what I am also hoping for the audiences observing and experiencing the work. To leave the space with new questions, new conversations and a sense of relief or release, even if it’s small and temporary. Art has many limitations , but has a lot of freedom and power in the way we think about those frustrating and painful social issues. A shift of thinking and empowerment through art can eventually influence our personal actions, as well as their impact on our feelings and mental state.” 

MATHETA Dance! Come see them present a piece on October 27th: 8:00pm, The Works studio

 

Screen+Shot+2018-10-04+at+12.47.17+PM[1]Khensani Mathebula: Artistic Director/Choreographer (MATHETA Dance)

Khensani Mathebula (Johannesburg, South Africa) trained in modern concert dance under the instruction of Ms. Laraine Rabin. In 2010 she was discovered by international guest Ms. Ana Marie Forsythe at a Horton workshop in her hometown, and recruited to the competitive Ailey School/Fordham University BFA program in New York City. Ms. Mathebula was awarded an Emily Blavatnik/Ailey Artistic Scholarship, and a National Scholarship for Dance from CATHSSETA to attend the program. She graduated Cum Laude as a double major in Dance and Political Science in 2015. She adjudicated ‘Solo Performance’ in Johannesburg – a prestigious modern dance examination she passed with distinction. She has performed works by noteworthy choreographers including Ronald K. Brown, Matthew Rushing, Michael Leon Thomas and Vincent Mantsoe, as well as Alvin Ailey in the work Memoria at New York City Center Theater. She is a current professional dancer with Alpha Omega Theatrical Dance Company. As an emerging choreographer, Ms. Mathebula was selected as an independent choreographer at The Ailey School to produce her own show in 2015. Since then she has presented work in choreography festivals around the city. In 2017 she founded her own company: Matheta Dance, with aspirations to build its presence in both the States and South Africa.

Here are some of her views on her upcoming HATCH presentation!

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

“Presenting this work in progress gives me the chance to take a step back and be more objective. It allows me to determine if I am achieving the choreographic vision I have hoped for, and more easily pinpoint areas of improvement.” 

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

“The most rewarding dancers to work with are those who are talented not only musically but also theatrically. They are committed to the work, and dependable. These are the best attributes I can have in a dancer, and I require all of them.  It is an honor to create material and see it be valued and cared for by such dancers.” 

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

“It is important to present this piece in NYC because like so many others, this crazy crowded diverse unpredictable frustrating illuminating mesmerizing city …is my home. Thus, I am humbled by any and every opportunity given to me to share my story, as it is a chance to share my spirit through my choreography with group of people that is inevitably diverse in every way. The name of my company, MATHETA, is a play on the word “theta” which means “to speak” in Xhosa, my mother’s native tongue of South Africa. I want my dancers to speak through movement, connecting with audiences far and wide, whether the performance is here in NYC or across the world in South Africa.” 

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

“HATCH audiences can look forward to great music, great dancing and a meaningful message.”

Check out Cara Leggio! See her work on October 27th: 8:00pm at The Works studio.

 

Cara Leggio Retouch 3Cara Leggio

Cara Leggio is a native New Yorker, who has trained her whole life to become a professional, working artist. Born and raised on Long Island, she grew up studying all genres of dance, singing, acting, writing, and creating. She attended a Performing Arts High School and spent  summers attending the Joffrey Ballet School’s various Summer Intensives, as well as other collegiate intensives. Cara began her formal, professional training at The Joffrey Ballet School. First as a Ballet Trainee, then eventually transitioning into the Jazz & Contemporary Program. During her time at Joffrey, she performed in local touring theater productions. Cara continued her professional education at The Institute for American Musical Theatre, where she graduated in the Inaugural Class. During her time at IAMT, she continued freelance performing & choreographing.

Here are some of her thoughts on her upcoming presentation!

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

“I believe performing a work in progress is always incredibly useful for the creative process. You, as a choreographer, are only one point of view and one interpretation. Having an audience full of unique individuals with their own thoughts, points of view, and interpretation can give you an informed, non-biased response to the work. Helping you check yourself in a way; Am I conveying my message clearly enough? Is this the desired reaction/response? etc.”

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

“To me, the most rewarding dancers to work with are ones who are generous. Generous with their time, patience, talents, and spirit. I love to work with dancers who are passionate about story telling and utilize their minds just as much as their bodies to the craft of that story telling.” 

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

“I think NYC is full of outcasts and misfits and all different kinds of unique, interesting individuals. This piece of choreography embodies that familiar feeling most New Yorkers feel; of not fitting a certain mold or image, of feeling frustrated or confined to one way of life, “The American Dream” looks and feels and is different to every person. This work embodies that feeling to remind us that none of us are alone.”

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

“Audiences should look forward to a brilliant soloist, Hana Kozuka, through a combination of improvisation and set choreography, beautifully telling this raw, uncomfortable, honest story.”  

HANA.3

Check out one of our HATCH Choreographers, Luiza Karnas! See her work on October 27th: 8:00pm at The Works studio.

Luiza Karnas

photography credit: Olivia Cacciatore

LUIZA KARNAS

Luiza Karnas is a dance artist and educator originally from Porto Alegre, Brazil. She recently received her M.F.A from SUNY The College at Brockport, NY, and graduated from Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul – UFRGS (Brazil) with a degree in Dance Education. In 2013, Karnas was a Brazil Scientific Mobility Program scholarship recipient and studied at Hofstra University (Long Island/NY) for one academic year. A tap enthusiast from the heart, her interests also include intensive training in ballet and modern dance. She has studied and performed with teachers and choreographers from Brazil and the United States. Karnas has presented choreographic works at venues in Brazil and NYC, including Teatro Renascença, Dixon Place, Triskelion Arts, Center for Performance Research, and more. Karnas is thrilled to pursue new professional opportunities in the realms of education, performance, and choreography in New York City.

Here is a look at Luiza Karnas’s views on her upcoming HATCH piece!

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

“It is helpful to perform a work in progress because it gives me a general notion of how the work is being received by audience members: what they see, how they feel during and/or after the performance, what moments in the choreography are more striking to them. All the information is helpful to continue my choreographic research.”

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

“My creative process is based on a collaborative relationship with the dancers, which makes me look for movers that are able to bring ideas to the table, to show their personality and style, and share their experiences.” 

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

“I think it’s very important to receive audience’s feedback after a performance. Then, to present “The Things We Leave Behind” to audience in NYC is vital because the different artistic experiences the audience members had allow them to have a fresh and particular interpretation of my work, which is helpful on the further development of “The Things We Leave Behind.”’

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

“They should expect a tap dance piece in which I explore the relationship between intricate rhythms and quality of movement.”