Meet the Choreographer — Lisa Kusanagi

Meet the Choreographer — Lisa Kusanagi

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This weekend marks the end of the Spring 2014 HATCH Series.  Don’t miss your final chance to see great new works by emerging choreographers!

Saturday, May 24th at 8pm Lisa Kusanagi will be presenting a solo work (“16 Day Return Policy”) to audiences at the Works Studio in Chelsea.  Keep reading to learn a bit about Lisa’s background and be sure to meet her and the other choreographers after the performance for a live Q+A!

 

Choreographer Bio

Lisa Kusanagi-Official HeadshotLisa Kusanagi is a Dance Expressionist. She came to the U.S. in 2007 and graduated cum laude with a BA in Theatre Arts and Dance from Sonoma State University, CA. Kusanagi is a member of Mark Haim Dance and Theater since 2012. She has performed with the company and as a freelance dance artist, both nationally (NY–The Joyce Theater, CA, WA, NC, VA, and ME) and internationally (France, Germany, and Japan). In 2014, her original choreographed dance works have been selected into the HATCH Performance Series (NY), the Judson Church STUFFED (NY), the Greensboro Dance Film Festival (NC), and the Marginal Arts Festival (VA). Kusanagi is currently working towards her MFA in Dance at Hollins University, where she was nominated for a student fellowship. She is continuously investigating and creating intellectual virtuosity through physical artistry. Visit her website: http://www.lisakusanagi.com

 

Choreographer Artist Statement2460744_orig

Lisa Kusanagi is a Dance Expressionist. Her creative process and her life experiences are not separate entities from one another; rather, they co-exist. She believes that it is through movement that we activate our existence in the world, and that da
nce is one of the most organic and radical expressions. Dance is not an indulgent or luxurious art form, but rather a political action. She theorizes life through dance, the non-linguistic expressive art form of movement, because the body knows infinitely more than what the mind allows us to comprehend.

 

hatchHatch Presenting Series

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011


Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00


Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

Meet the Choreographer — Stephanie Deere

Meet the Choreographer — Stephanie DeereStephanie%20Image%202

Stephanie will be presenting a group work for her company, MachineHistronica, to HATCH audiences at the Works Studio this Saturday, May 24th.  Be at the Works Studio at 8pm to treat yourself to the final HATCH performance of the season!

Read on to learn about Stephanie and her dancers and be sure to join us for a Q+A session after the performance!

 

Questions for the Choreographer

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

I personally believe every work is forever a “work in progress”. Some are just further along than others. People are constantly changing based on their environment, life circumstances, personal goals, etc and this means our art is forever evolving. If I were to revive a previous work, I’m sure I would change some of it. Nothing is ever “finished”. And that is the beauty of creating. Dance only happens once. Even the same dance is different every time it is performed. The audience members have the pleasure of seeing something that will only happen one time. What a reason to appreciate those moments! Audience feedback is invaluable; whether the piece premiered ten years ago or was put together ten hours ago.Stephanie%20Image%201-1

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

I am currently working with the most rewarding dancers I could imagine. They are all my peers and dear friends. I have tremendous respect for them as artists and as women. I know that they are all technically trained and that is a very small piece of what is required of them in MachineHistrionica. I urge them to bring their own thoughts, experiences, and personalities to the work. I ask them to not only meet me at the physical movement, but to go on a journey with me through our hearts and our minds. I am only interested in creating work that is thought-provoking and emotionally moving, not just for audience members, but for my dancers as well. These five women all come to every rehearsal prepared physically, mentally, and emotionally for whatever the journey of dance-making requires of them. Sometimes literally blood, sweat, and tears. I am a very lucky choreographer.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

“Every Direction, All At Once” is an extremely personal piece to me. As a choreographer, this is what I desire to present at this point in my career. The piece is about feminine social structure and the evolution of women’s lives in westernized cultures. While I do believe this is an important topic to address in art, I created this piece as a journey for me and my dancers. I am hoping that a genuinely personal journey for us will translate into a personal journey for our audience members.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

HATCH audiences should look forward to being able to form a strong opinion about my work. Between the subject matter, intense physicality, character development, and music choices, I have tried to create a work that evokes thoughts and emotions from audience members. As long as I have created work that people have to think about, I am happy.

 


Choreographer Bio

Stephanie%20HeadshotStephanie Deere is a native of sunny and warm Southern California. Her earliest memories involve dance, and this complex art form continued to be a passion of hers throughout high school and college.  Stephanie graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of California, Irvine with her BA in Dance and a minor in Management where she studied under notable choreographers such as Loretta Livingston, Lisa Naugle, Molly Lynch, Diane Diefenderfer, Jodi Gates, and Sharon Wray. After graduation, Stephanie moved to Hollywood in order to pursue her career in dance. After a year of commercial exploration and taking classes at The Edge and with Los Angeles Contemporary Dance Company, she decided to continue her dance training and come to New York City for a summer of classes. Stephanie was offered a position as a company member with Undertoe Dance Project and decided to stay in New York. After a debilitating lower back injury, she could no longer perform, however, she was still able to pursue another passion of hers, choreography. Stephanie launched her own company MachineHistrionica (machinehdance.com) in the fall of 2013.  She feels extremely blessed to be creating work with such strong, intelligent, and talented women and to be premiering work in New York City.

 

Dancer Bios

Melanie Ciraulo: Melanie Ciraulo was born and raised in northern California, in Granite Bay, a small town outside of Sacramento. She has been dancing since the age of three, where she first started dancing for the Sacramento Kings. When she was six, she started training at a local studio, Off Broadway Dancing. There she trained in tap, ballet, jazz, lyrical, African, and musical theater, where she continued her training until college. Melanie then moved to Los Angeles to purse her dream of being on Broadway. She graduated with her Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Arts from AMDA (American Musical and Dramatic academy), and has now been living in New York City following her dreams for nearly two years.

Cristina Gustaitis: Cristina Gustaitis began her formal training with the Indiana University Ballet Theatre in Bloomington, Indiana. She holds a BS in Dance Performance from Ball State University. Since graduating with honors in 2011, she has relocated to New York City where she currently works as a freelance dancer and collaborator. Cristina has had the opportunity to study and perform in Italy, France and Sweden as well as throughout the Midwest and East coast. In addition to her work with MachineHistrionica, she is a company member of Treeline Dance Works. Her most recent performance credits include UPPAdanse, France, American Dance Guild Festival, NYC, Dance Chicago, Chicago, Breaking Ground Festival, AZ and Abundance International Festival, Sweden. She is thrilled to be a part of a creative group of individuals under the fearless and inspirational direction of Stephanie Deere.Stephanie%20Headshot%202

Rebecca Hite Teicheira: Rebecca Hite Teicheira received her Masters of Fine Arts in dance choreography/ performance from Smith College in Northampton, MA, where she was also a teaching fellow and guest artist at Amherst College. Previously, Rebecca received her BA in dance from Connecticut College.  During this time, she interned with BoSoma Dance of Boston, MA and Parsons Dance of New York City, and was fortunate enough to spend five months in Sydney, Australia, studying Graham technique and dance composition.  Rebecca has collaborated with renowned artists such as David Dorfman, Lisa Race, Heidi Henderson, Adele Myers, Nicholas Leichter, Jeremy Nelson, Wally Cardona, and Monica Bill Barnes.  Additionally, Rebecca has taught at the American College Dance Festival’s New England Region 2011 and 2012, the Sunday Dance Series in Florence, MA and Astoria Fine Arts Dance in Astoria, NY. Currently, Rebecca dances with The Feath3r Theory under the artistic direction of Raja Kelly as well as with Jessica Goldberg, and is co-creator and co-artistic director of Reject Dance Theatre .  Rebecca’s work has been presented at Triskelion Arts in Brooklyn, NY, Built on Stilts Festival in Martha’s Vineyard, MA, MixMatch Dance Festival in Los Angeles, California, Trinity Repertory Theater in Providence, RI and the Astoria Dance Festival in Astoria, NY.

Monica Lessard: Monica Lessard is a spunky New Hampshire native trained classically in the RAD syllabus. She is a 2007 graduate of Point Park University’s (Pittsburgh, PA) Conservatory of Performing Arts with a Bachelor of Arts in Dance. Monica was a frequent performer with the Playhouse Dance Company at the Conservatory, training and performing under the direction of Doug Bentz, Judith Leifer-Bentz, Susan Stowe, Nicolas Petrov, Jay Kirk, Ron Tassone and Keisha Lalama-White. She moved to New York City in 2009 and has danced with GlitterKitty Productions and The Devon Smith Dance Company. Monica shares her love of dance on a daily basis teaching children and young adults all over the tri-state area. She is so thrilled to be a part of MachineHistrionica!

Colleen Pictor: Colleen Pictor, a native of Rochester, NY, graduated summa cum laude with a BFA in Dance from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University. Currently residing in Brooklyn, Colleen is the founder and artistic director of the Pic PAC (the Pictor Performing Arts Company) and has presented her work at WAXworks, Your Move Dance Festival, The Tank, the Astoria Dance Festival, Legros Cultural Arts’ Women in Dance Summer Showcase, and The Hatch presenting series. In September 2013, she presented her work at The Rochester Fringe Festival in upstate New York. She is the recipient of the Margery Turner Choreography Award as well as the Colonel Henry Rutgers Research Scholar Award, and has performed the work of Garth Fagan, Mark Morris, Inbal Pinto, Keith Thompson, Jennifer Muller, and Stuart Loungway, among others. Colleen assists with the Paul Taylor School outreach program in PS 110 and is a staff member at the Front Desk at the Mark Morris Dance Group.

 

hatchHatch Presenting Series

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00


Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

 

Meet the Choreographer — Callie Hatchett

Meet the Choreographer — Callie Hatchett

This Saturday marks the last HATCH performance of the Spring 2014 series!  Don’t miss your last chance to see a great new group of choreographers this Saturday, May 24th at 8pm.

Callie Hatchett will be presenting her work “Acquired Alliance” to audience at the Works Studio in Chelsea this weekend.  In this post you’ll find more information about Callie and her dancers but be sure to stick around after the performance for a live Q+A session!

 

Questions for the ChoreographerCallieHatchett (Callie Hatchett Dance)

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

Presenting a work in progress is helpful because it gives me the the chance to hear feedback and to see my work through other eyes.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

I enjoy working with dancers who contribute to the choreographic process, because their ideas and creative initiate help my work to evolve.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

I would like to present this work to create an experience that reaches people on both a visceral and intellectual level.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

In my work, HATCH audiences should look forward seeing a relationship build and unfold through the integration of the visual aspects of movement, the emotive complexities of music, and the intrinsic illustration of humanity.

 

Choreographer Bio

CallieHatchettHeadshot-HATCHCallie Hatchett grew up in rural Alabama. Although her childhood was spent in the midst of farmlands and country roads, she was introduced to a very different world when she began studying Vagonava based classical ballet under the direction of Meryane Martin Murphy. From her first pirouette, she was hooked. Later, as a teenager, Callie developed a new artistic love when she discovered the freedom and expressive power of modern dance.

Upon completing her Bachelor of Arts degree in dance from The University of Alabama, she performed with Southern Danceworks, directed by Terri Weksler. Through grant funded projects designed to expose underserved communities to the arts, Callie has taught dance and creative movement in numerous public elementary and junior high schools.  She is a certified Pilates instructor through the Pilates Certification Center.  In 2008 she was the Alabama State Council on the Arts Fellowship recipient.  Before relocating to New York City, Callie served as the Assistant Artistic Director of Andalusia Ballet, teaching ballet, modern, and Pilates, and choreographing works for stage performance, as well as community events.

In May of 2012, Callie completed her MFA in Dance Performance and Choreography from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. She has had the pleasure of performing in the works of Deborah Jowitt, Cherylyn Lavagnino, Sydney Skybetter, Wes Veldink, Thaddeus Davis, and Charles Weidman.  She has taught for The Harlem Dance Leadership Program, Future Dancers and Dancemakers, The Legacy School, and Hunter College.  Callie has presented her choreography at Dancenow’s RAW Festival, Dixon Place, Music and Motion, Composer’s Voice, Fertile Ground, the Bessie Schonberg Choreography Intensive, and for Andalusia Ballet. Callie currently teaches dance for Success Academy Charter Schools in the South Bronx.

 

Dancer Bios

CarolineDietz (CallieHatchettDance) HeadshotCaroline Dietz

Caroline Dietz is from Chester, New Jersey. She trained at Ballet Forte and New Jersey Dance Theatre Ensemble from 2003 until graduating high school in 2009. She then went on to graduate from the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU with a BFA in dance in 2012. There she performed works by choreographers Kate Weare and Aszure Barton. Post graduation, she joined Carolyn Dorfman Dance Company in September 2012 and is currently in her second season with the company.

Stanton Jacinto


StantonJacinto(Callie HatchettDance)Headshot

Born and raised in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, Stanton began his training at the Mid-Pacific Institute School of the Arts under the guidance of Paul Maley and Sylvia Yamada-Brown. Stanton recently graduated from New York University with a BFA in Dance and a Minor in Sociology. He has attended the Perry-Mansfield Performing Arts Summer Camp, the American Dance Festival, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Dance. In the Summer of 2012, Stanton studied abroad at the Salzburg Experimental Academy of Dance in Salzburg, Austria. As a student of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, Stanton has performed in the faculty works of Pamela Pietro and Renee Redding-Jones, in the guest choreography works of Alex Ketley and Mark Morris, and in various student works. Outside of Tisch, Stanton has had the pleasure of performing and working with Ensemble Dance, Callie Hatchett Dance and MADboots Dance Co.  Most recently, Stanton attended Springboard Danse Montreal where he had the pleasure of working and performing in a new work by Stephan Laks of the Gothenburg Ballet.

 

hatchHatch Presenting Series

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00


Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

Meet the Choreographer — Sharon C. Montella

Meet the Choreographer — Sharon C. Montella

At the final HATCH performance of the spring series, Sharon is presenting a solo work titled “Unthinkable” to the Works Studio audiences.  Don’t miss it, this Saturday, May 24th at 8pm!

Read on to learn about Sharon’s background and why she is excited to present her work-in-progress to NYC audiences!

 

Questions for the ChoreographerSharon%20fitness%20shot%20in%20blue%20shirt.IMG_1144-118_RET_2

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?  

I find audience feedback helpful as it provides ideas for me to modify the piece and clarify its direction.  It is also a nice performing experience in which I feel freer to present my work without the pressure of presenting a completed work and the expectations that brings.  It is fun to think I am building something and the audience can be a part of that.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

I am presenting a solo this time, but I find it rewarding to work with dancers who are focused and eager for the work I am creating, as well as with dancers who have a good memory for new choreography.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

I have always felt energized by coming to New York and dancing, training and presenting work.  There is a rich dance culture and history that leaves gives audiences a keen awareness and open-mindedness when viewing new work.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

Audiences can look forward to a strong sense of musicality, rhythm, flow and range of energy dynamics in my piece, as well as a strong performance quality in the dancing.

 

Sharon%20C.%20Montella%20sideview%20-%207KB%20size%201IMG_1074-48_RET_2Choreographer’s Bio

Sharon Montella holds an M.F.A. in Dance from the Boston Conservatory and black belts in kung fu and tai chi.  She has danced for Michael Mao at City Center, Kelley Donovan at Joyce Soho, and Boston Dance Company.   She has performed her own works at Triskelion Theater for WAXworks, Pearl Studios, Tenjune and The Exchange.   In Boston, she choreographed the release of Justin Timberlake’s Cologne ‘Play’ at Macy’s and an independent project entitled ‘Moses Project’ on members of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.   She teaches at UMass Boston. She credits her Lord with supplying all her inspiration and energy and is grateful to be returning to HATCH!

 

hatchHatch Presenting Series

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011


Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00


Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

Meet the Choreographers — Alexandra Bodnarchuk and Zëk Stewart

Meet the Choreographers — Alexandra Bodnarchuk and Zëk Stewart


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Join us for the final HATCH performance of the spring series!  This Saturday, May 24th, Alexandra Bodnarchuk and Zëk Stewart will be presenting a duet they choreographed on themselves.

Keep reading to learn about the process and each of the choreographer’s backgrounds!  Following the 8pm performance will be a live Q+A with all of the choreographers from this week’s series!

 

Questions for the Choreographers

connunknown_lcdill_360Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

Zëk – The act of being watched changes a piece. Not only does the audience aid us with their feedback (which is absolutely essential), the experience of their energy and immediate response molds the piece, shapes it into something new. Once a piece is seen it can begin to mature. We put the ingredients into the bottle, but the audience puts the cork in and begins the process of ageing the wine.

Alexandra – As dancers showing a work in progress and discussing the work with the audience enables us to realize what they are and aren’t picking up on. This tells us which parts of the piece are clear and flow well from one to another, and which parts need work. It also keeps us on our toes so that we don’t get stagnant in our process – it pushes us to be more creative and get out of our comfort zone.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

Alexandra: The most rewarding dancers for me to work with are dancers who think and ask questions. I tend to ask a lot from them, so they need to have the ability to dig deep emotionally, be spatially aware, and have the ability to improvise off a framework of movement ideas and intentions. When I choreograph I go into each rehearsal with a game plan, but it isn’t until I get into the space and start working with the dancers that I uncover the specifics of the piece. I think that’s one of the reasons why Zëk and I work together well – our rehearsals are a combination of talking as well as dancing.

Zëk – Working with any dancer from any background can and will be wonderfully rewarding for me, so long as our main goal is to bring something, anything emotionally honest to the work. In its purest form, I think that dance, if not all art, is a of ritual act of cleansing, a sort trial and crucible of the soul. As artists we are granted the time and the space to work though the messes we’ve locked up in ourselves or messes we see locked up in others. In return we have to present what we’ve sorted out from that mess in whole or in part upon the stage as an offering and aid to those who might find themselves in a similar situation. I love working with dancers who don’t leave their mess at the door, but bring it to the table, so that like collaborative chemists we can sort through their unlabeled small plastic sandwich-bags of turmoil and toss them into the trials of intellectual mush I’ve begun to construct.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

Alexandra: Coming from Pittsburgh we are used to particular type of audience. This audience is more reserved and is gradually becoming connunknown_lcdill_502accustomed to work that is more experimental and not ballet based. For me, I am looking to see where we stand on a larger dance scale and how a New York audience will react to our work. As an emerging artist I am very interested in having this feedback so that I can continue to grow as an artist.

Zëk: New York is an amazing city, with a cultural scene that hums at a fever pitch, but through the artists I’ve met here, I’ve noticed here that it’s easy to let a bit of iron form itself about your heart. There’s a need, due to the cost of living, to deliver; to bring to the table a package complete with bow. When something is considered complete, it loses a bit of it’s vitality. It’s no longer raw and urgent but rather armored and polished. It may be better to look at, but you as an audience member lose out on the sense of inclusion which a work in progress provides. When you attempt to patch up all the seams, somehow a good of amount of the passion seeps out. When a show is set it begins to reject the vulnerability of spontaneity and as such begins to reject what it means to be a live medium in the first place. I won’t say that New York doesn’t have the lion’s share of improv, new works and works in progress, I know for a fact that it does. I’m just happy to add to that lion’s share, in hope that one day, through sheer overwhelming numbers and passion, we the gypsy-vagabond-artists of now will coke out that lion and take our place once again in the street-side corner cafes and pop-up loft apartment theaters that we once called home.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

Physicality. Visceral impact. Moments of tenderness. Intimacy. For us to test the boundaries our Trust. Point of Exploitation [Trust]. Deconstruction between the line and draw between two individuals.

 

Choreographers’ Bios

abodnarchuk_lcdill_06Alexandra Bodnarchuk – Steel City native and current resident, Alexandra Bodnarchuk, is a dance artist currently choreographing CONNOTATIONS: unknown, a work based on her experience as an actor in Bricolage’s STRATA (2012).  Her STRATA performance was described as having‘a great sense of the subtle gestures necessary to experience the intimacy of a slow dance’ which ‘is why the Infinity Room was so effective’.  She is very excited to be creating this work alongside many talented local dancers, artists and musicians, and looks forward to the premiere in Spring 2014.  Alexandra has worked with Pittsburgh-based Attack Theatre in such capacities as: Intern, Teaching Partner, Special Assistant to the creative process (Soap Opera), dancer (The Dirty Ball) and most recently, Costume Assistant (Chalk Line ‘13). This past summer she had the pleasure of attending the Bates Dance Festival for the second time, studying under Nancy Stark Smith, Kathleen Hermesdorf and Bridgman | Packer Dance. Past BDF instructors include Carl Flink, Rachel List and Shonach Mirk-Robles.  Alexandra is a cum laude graduate of Ohio University ‘12 with a B.F.A. in Dance Performance and Choreography and a B.A. in French.

ZekStewartZëk Stewart – Born of the Burgh and raised just the same, Zëk is a writer, dancer, director, actor and singer. For the past 2 years Zëk has been resident artist of The Space Upstairs, dancing with the Pillow Project, helping to forward their new approach to dance most recently termed post-Jazz. Along with dancing (and at times hosting) Second Saturdays, their monthly jazz-happenings, Zëk performed in 2084(Red Light), originated Siegfried in the world premiere of Dirty Swan, and helped to convert the Carrie Furnace (one of Pittsburgh’s last surviving blast furnaces) into the Jazz Furnace, a 12 hour 2 part post-modern rock concert of a dance performance. Over the past year, he also collaborated with Yes Brain Dance Theatre in the creation of a movement based, genderfuck-ed adaptation of Sam Sheppard’s Fool for Love. His current projects include (a.)a short story about the fragility of life and how we’re all really just someone else’s short story in the end, (b.)a dance for film piece very loosely based on the play BUG by Tracy Letts, (c.) a faux-documentary film, faux-filmed in the 70’s which uses a subtle behind-the-camera background plot to tell the story of either a cinematographers slow decent into madness over the loss of his son or his discovery of something very real and absolutely terrifying, and (d.) this lovely piece here, of course. He is also moving to New York in the coming month(s) and works full time. When he says it all out loud at once, the corner of his eye twitches uncontrollably. Zëk graduated cum laude from Point Park University with a B.A. in Musical Theatre.

 

hatch
Hatch Presenting Series

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00


Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

 

Meet the Choreographers — A.J. Pflumm

Meet the Choreographers — A.J. Pflumm

Creating Alchemy

This weekend is the last HATCH Series of the season!  Don’t miss your last opportunity to see works by emerging choreographers Saturday, May 24 at 8pm!

A.J. Pflumm will be presenting a solo work titled “perched on the convergence” to audiences at the Works Studio in Chelsea.  Read on to learn about A.J.’s background and what you should be watching for in his work.  And don’t forget to stick around after the performance for a Q+A session with the choreographers!

 

Questions for the Choreographer

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?Buses for My Brother (2)

It’s helpful to present a work in progress because outside critique from audiences helps to ground a choreographer and keep a company successful.  Learning what audiences like to see and what sort of imagery moves them is important to the creation process and to creating pieces that touch audiences in profound ways.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

For me, the most rewarding dancer is one who is willing to take risks and learn.  My movement tends to follow an organic path of momentum, which can feel haphazard to some dancers. I like to work with dancers who are willing to flow with that feeling of risk and danger and I love to see them gain more confidence as they grow more accustomed to my movement.  It’s so gratifying to see that “aha!” moment happen for a dancer who’s been struggling with a phrase.  I live for that.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

“perched on the convergence.” is important to present due to the subject matter.  The theme of the piece is dealing with the idea that as one ages, their seemingly infinite number of possible lives dwindle until they end up with thelife they lived.  I have so much I want to do in my life and those desires have a tendency to make me anxious and frustrated that I cannot do and be more than I already am.  I think that’s a common frustration and I want to show people that they are not alone in those thoughts and that it’s okay to feel that way.  There’s healing in making connections and that’s what I’m out to do.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?

Look forward to some odd angles, momentum based movement, and human moments.  But also look forward to seeing something that I hope makes you think of yourself and your life in a slightly different way.  I want to connect with you and I hope you can connect with me too.


A.J. HeadshotChoreographer Bio

A.J. Pflumm- A recent New York transplant, A.J. received his BFA in Dance Performance and Choreography from Wichita State.  He has been in numerous pieces created by choreographers such as Janice Garrett, Darrell Grand Moultrie, Aaron McGloin, Cheyla Clawson, Rachel Boyajian, and Sam Householder.  He has created pieces for Mid-America Contemporary Dance Theatre (KS), Pink Pig Ballet (NY), and Ballet Wichita (KS) and has produced two evening length works, one in conjunction with fellow performer Ross McCorkell, in Kansas (Emergence, Touch Me).  A.J. currently works as a freelance choreographer and performer and produces his work through his by-project company CaptiveFlow Dance.  www.facebook.com/captiveflowdance

 

hatchHatch Presenting Series

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00


Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

 

Meet the Choreographer — Rebecca Woll

Meet the Choreographer — Rebecca Woll

 

Join us for one of the final HATCH performances for the season this Saturday, May 17 at 8pm!

Rebecca Woll and her company, reWIND Dance, return to the Works Studio this weekend for their second HATCH Presenting Series.  This week, Rebecca is presenting a duet for two women titled “Held.”  Read on to learn about Rebecca’s background and hear why she is excited to be back for a second HATCH!

 

Questions for the ChoreographerREWind 1

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?    Presenting a work in progress allows me to see the work from the eyes of an
audience and to go back in and restructure/change accordingly. Often parts of pieces that I love in rehearsal don’t read on stage and presenting the work in progress gives me the opportunity to make sure the final product is exactly what I wanted to portray.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?    I like to work with dancers who think when they are given choreography and don’t just accept themselves as machines. My dancers give input about what the piece/movement means to them, what doesn’t feel natural to them, and ideas they think might work well within the piece.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?    NYC audiences are not afraid to share their thoughts. I welcome and value audience input during this performance and am curious to hear thoughts from an audience who is well acquainted with many different dance forms and pieces.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?    Audiences should look forward to the mix of present day modern dance with the technique of Duncan dance. My work seeks to update the original Isadora Duncan themes and choreography and to relate it to present ideas that audiences can understand and access.

 

Choreographer Bio

Rebecca Elizabeth Woll was a founding member of the Isadora Duncan Youth Ensemble with which she toured internationally for over 10 years. She has a bachelor’s degree in Dance and English from Connecticut College and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Motor Learning and Control from Columbia University. Rebecca has been a member of Naomi Goldberg Haas, Dances for a Variable Population, and BE Dance Collective and was a founding member, choreographer, and director of operations for isadoraNOW, a contemporary dance company. She has had the opportunity to perform with David Dorfman Dance’s “Underground” project at Lincoln Center’s “Out of Doors” festival and has performed original works by Lisa Race, Alexandra Beller, Doug Elkins, Dan Wagoner, Jeremy Nelson and Heidi Henderson among others. Rebecca’s choreography currently showing under the name reWIND dance, has been as been seen and produced by Joyce SoHo in NYC as part of the theater’s season, American College Dance Festival (Williams College), Connecticut College, Belvoir Terrace (Lenox, MA), and numerous high schools throughout the tri-state area.

 

Dancer Bios

REWind 2From an early age, Sophie Maguire was a member of the Isadora Duncan Youth Ensemble, with whom she traveled to Hungary, The Czech Republic, Scotland, and Hawaii. Sophie graduated with honors, in dance, from Connecticut College, where she studied with and danced for David Dorfman, Shani Collins, Heidi Henderson, Adele Myers, Lisa Race, Robyne Watkin, Nicholas Leichter, Monica Bill Barnes, and Colleen Thomas. In the winter of 2010, Sophie founded lonely goat. Sophie’s work has been shown at the 2010 American College Dance Festival, Studio A (CT), Rooftop Dance Performance Series, Art CartNYC’s Truck Yeah!, The Asheville Fringe Festival (NC), Greenspace, The Construction Company, The Chi Movement Center (PA), The Hygienic Art Gallery (CT), Westfest at Westbeth, Dixon Place, DNA, Triskelion Arts, and Galapagos Art Space. lonely goat has enjoyed several residencies at The Dragon’s Egg in Mystic, CT. In addition, Sophie dances for Raja Feather Kelly, as part of the feath3r theory and curated a master class series in Northampton, MA.

Katie Vason, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, graduated from Connecticut College with a double major in dance & self-designed major environmental politics. Since moving to NYC, Katie has danced with BE Dance Collective, Tough Cookie Dance, Kitchen Sink Collective, and The
Lovelies, performing at various locations in and around New York City. She has presented her own work at Triskelion, White Wave CoolNY dance festival, Movement Research, and Dixon Place. Katie is a certified Pilates Instructor on equipment through the Kane School of Core Integration, currently teaching at studios in Brooklyn and Manhattan.

 


hatchHatch Presenting Series

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00

Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

Meet the Choreographers — Rebecca McCormac

Meet the Choreographers —

Rebecca McCormac

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This Saturday, May 17, The Works will be presenting the latest HATCH Series featuring a wonderful group of artists!  Don’t miss your chance to see one of the last HATCH performances of the season!

Rebecca McCormac will be presenting her work “Of Loss: Grief Transitions” with her company, CoreDance Contemporary, this week at the Works Studio in Chelsea.  Rebecca’s program note for this work says, “Of Loss:  Grief’s Transitions” is an exploration of the seven stages we as human beings go through when dealing with a grief situation.  A multifaceted response to loss, particularly to the loss of someone or something to which a bond was formed, grief has emotional, physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, spiritual and philosophical dimensions.  In essence,  Grief is reactive.”

Following the performance there will be a Q+A session with all of the choreographers, but read on to get a glimpse of Rebecca’s work and background and meet her five dancers!

 

Questions for the Choreographer

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?    It is helpful to present a work in progress as it gives a choreographer an opportunity to debut if you will a short excerpt of a larger work to be assessed with discourse and criticism by his or her peers.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?    Dancers that are fully committed to the rehearsal process.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?    Because it is a collaboration between two Australian Artists; myself as choreographer and Andrea Breen as composer.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?    Physicality, diversity and complex structure.

 

Choreographer Bio

Rebecca McCormacOriginally from Brisbane, Australia, Ms. McCormac completed her Masters in Dance with at The Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts in 2006.  A registered teacher of The Royal Academy of Dance, Ms. McCormac holds her Jazz Award and Teaching Diploma in Tap for the Commonwealth Society of Teachers of Dance and in 2002 was the recipient of the Commonwealth Society of Teachers of Dances’ Blue Sash Award.   A successful audition for LINK Dancer’s Company in 2005, spurred a European tour and an invitation to join the Golden Key International Honor Society.  In 2008, Ms. McCormac moved to New York City to join Barry Blumenfeld’s Tap Fusion, Ellen Stokes-Shadle’s Dance Works and the faculty at Perfect Pointe Performing Arts Studio.  In 2011, Ms McCormac founded CoreDance Contemporary, an Australian Modern Dance Company, which holds residence in New York City.  Still living and working in the New York Tri-State area, she has been commissioned to teach and choreograph contemporary, modern and tap work on both a national and international scale.  Most recently she was commissioned to create the opening number for the C.S.T.D. Convention Gala in Brisbane, Australia.  McCormac has an interdisciplinary approach to her work drawing ideas both contextually and visually to create work that is engaging for herself and her audience.  Her work has been shown at Alvin Ailey, Steps on Broadway, DANY Studios, PMT, Dixon Place, White Wave, Triskelion Arts and Green Space.

 

Dancer Bios


IMG_0032_wKate Bishop
 is a dancer and fitness professional making her way in New York City.  Hailing from Kissimmee Florida, she holds a BFA in Dance from New World School of the Arts under dance mentors Elaine Wright, Daniel Lewis, Peter London, Gerard Ebitz and Bambi Anderson.  She has worked with artists Liony Garcia, Darshawn Bhuller and Josee Garant as well as performing Robert Battle’s “Battlefield” abroad.  Kate has shown work in NYC since 2011 under project company Option Dance and is the co-founder/curator of SPARK Performance Forum, an annual networking based series for upcoming Performance talent.  Kate is also a full time Personal Trainer, working to enlighten her people on the importance of an efficient, moving body. Kate is so thrilled to be in her third season with Core Dance Contemporary.

Rose Buis is proud to be one of the founding members of CoreDance Contemporary. Rose has had a passion for dance her entire life. After graduating with a BFA in Dance from Valdosta State University, Rose traveled the high seas as a dancer for PGT Entertainment on both Regent Seven Seas and Princess Cruise lines. Rose has called New York home now for three years and is very excited for all future endeavors with Rebecca McCormac and CoreDance Contemporary.

D.2Maddison Clay, born and raised in Queensland, Australia, began dancing at the age of three, training in all facets of dance. After graduating high school in 2011, and having been accepted into ‘The Ailey School’ at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre Maddison moved to New York City in 2012 to begin her studies in the Professional Division. Maddison has traveled around the United States and Australia training and performing, working with choreographers such as Jessica Taylor, Kevin Wynn and Dionna PridGeon. In 2013 Maddison began working with CoreDance and became an apprentice for Asterial Dance. She is thankful for the opportunity to be part of CoreDance Contemporary and is excited to see what the future holds.


Julie DeGregorio 
is originally from Northern Virginia where she started dancing at the age of 3. She graduated from George Mason University in Fairfax, VA where she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Dance and the Excellence in Performance Award. At GMU, she had the privilege to perform works by Lar Lubovitch, Ohad Naharin, MarkMorris, David Parsons, Stephen Petronio, Martha Graham, Camille Brown, Susan Shields, and Christopher D’Amboise. She  has spent summers dancing with companies such as the Mark Morris Dance Group and received the 2012 Summer Scholarship to study with David Parsons. She currently lives in New York City and is thrilled to be dancing with CoreDance Contemporary.

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Jessica Nolan began her dance training in Australia and continued upon moving to Canada. In Edmonton, AB she graduated from Victoria School for the Performing and Visual Arts with a scholarship to attend The State University of New York (SUNY) Purchase. Jessica studied abroad at The Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts. While in the Conservatory of Dance at Purchase she performed works by George Balanchine, Twyla Tharp, Lar Lubovitch, Justin Rutzou and Kyle Abraham. Jessica had the opportunity to perform works by Marie Chouinard, and Manuel Vignoulle. She has performed with MADArt and Periapsis Music and Dance. This is Jessica’s second season dancing for CoreDance Contemporary under the directorship of Rebecca McCormac.

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HATCH Phatchresenting Series

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00

Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here!

Meet the Choreographers — Lauren Connolly

Meet the Choreographers — Lauren Connolly

 

Marred

This Saturday, The Works will be hosting the latest of the HATCH Series with another great batch of choreographers!

Lauren Connolly will be presenting her works in progress titled “Marred” to HATCH audiences on May 17th.  Don’t miss the chance to see one of the last performances of the HATCH spring season!

Keep reading to learn a little bit about why Lauren is so excited to be a part of the HATCH Series at the Works Studio in Chelsea.  Have a peek at her amazing dancers. And be sure to stick around after the performance for a Q+A with this weeks artists!

Questions for the Choreographer:

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?   Presenting a work in progress is key to the development of the piece. It is important to sit back and witness the growth of the piece in order to see where to go next. As vulnerable as it is, you need fresh and outside eyes. For me, the most exciting part of hearing an outsider’s opinion about the choices you have made or the overall vision of the piece is when they throw an idea or suggestion into the mix in which you never considered.  It is very easy to become lost in the process so to have the ability to hear feedback will push me to reevaluate, redirect or continue the direction of the work.Koresh Jan 2014 Showcase-1083

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?   Every choreographer wants a virtuosic and technically proficient vessel. I gravitate toward dancers who contribute to the atmosphere. Even if they are not in a section or piece, staying engaged is extremely important and vital to rehearsal. Dancers who ask questions and pay attention to details and the different nuances of the choreography stick out to me – even if it’s the subtly of how you hold your hand, or direction facing, initiation, etc. It’s rewarding to have dancers who embrace the unknown and have trust in the journey of the work as well as within themselves even when gray moments come about. It is refreshing to work with individuals who aren’t afraid of mistakes and embrace the struggle for staying hungry and wanting to constantly go deeper into the movement is important to discovery.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?   Having the opportunity to
present work in NYC will exposed my choreography to audiences who I usually do not have access to. Although I have been surrounded by other dancers and choreographers, this resource will provide me with awareness to my choreography in which I have not yet experienced.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?   I challenge myself as well as the dancers to embrace the unknown. I try to create and break down the barriers of the space by challenging traditional habits and developing new expressions to reinvigorate the collective mindset. I find my work to be detailed and precise but abandon and messy. Although the foundation of my movement tends to be one of a physical and athletic caliber, I am interested in showing the beauty in simplicity as well as the state of being exposed and vulnerable. As a company, we aim to continue to investigate of how dance can instigate effective transformations while changing mental structures and spatial relationships.

 

Choreographer bio:Lauren Connolly

Lauren Connolly graduated in 2010 with a BFA in Dance with academic honors from Mason Gross School of the Arts. She is the recipient of the Florence S. Domeshek Award for dedication and creativity in dance and the Dance Express Award for exceptional achievement as a choreographer. In May 2010, she presented her work at The Kennedy Center in Washington DC as part of The National College Dance Festival. She has also shown her work at other various venues throughout the New York, Philadelphia, and New Jersey area including New York Live Arts, Dance Teacher Summit, Salvatore Capezio Theater, the Rutgers 2010 Hall of Distinguished Alumni Awards, Your Move, Jersey City’s Modern Dance Showcase, Koresh Artist Showcase and George Street Playhouse. She is a freelance choreographer throughout the New York metro-area as well as curator of the Works in Progress Choreographer’s Residency of coLab Arts and Lustig Dance Theatre in New Brunswick NJ.

 

Dancer bios:

Nikki Albert, from Green Township, New Jersey, graduated cum laude from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University with a BFA in Dance, as well as an additional major in Communication. After graduating, Nikki has performed for Samuel Pott, as a company member of Nimbus Danceworks as well as Donna Scro in Freespace Dance. She has also worked with Graham Lustig in the opera Francesca da Rimini and Avianna Perez in Insurgo Stage Project. At Rutgers, Nikki has worked with choreographers Jennifer Muller, Inbal Pinto, Talia Beck, Doug Elkins, John Evans and Jeff Friedman. She was a member of University DanceWorks touring company and the assistant director to Keith Thompson.

Kelli McGovern is a graduate of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey with and Ed.M. in Dance Education from the Graduate School of Education and a B.F.A. in Dance Performance from Mason Gross School of the Arts. She is the Director of Dance at the Academy of Fine Arts and Academics at Bayonne High School and is an American Ballet Theatre® Certified Teacher, who has successfully completed the ABT® Teacher Training Intensive in Primary through Level 3 of the ABT® National Training Curriculum. She has performed at the work of Merce Cunningham, at the Joyce Theatre, Benoit Swan-Pouffer, Manuel Vignoulle, Randy James, Jeff Friedman, and John Evans.  Kelli currently dances professionally with Lauren Connolly, Zaman Dance Theatre, and is a freelance dancer for many choreographers throughout the New York metro-area.

Christina Lynch, from Maple Shade, NJ, graduated with her BFA in dance from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University in 2011.  She has had the opportunity to work with choreographers such as Randy James, Walburga Wolfgruber, Xiao-Xiong Zhang and Benoit-Swan Pouffer.  While at Mason Gross, Christina performed Lauren Connolly’s work, Vacillation Revisited, at the Kennedy Center as part of the National College Dance Festival as well as Benoit-Swan Pouffer’s work at the Joyce Theater in New York City.  After graduating from Rutgers, Christina moved to Denver, Colorado where she worked as an apprentice with Kim Robards Dance Company. Recently, Christina has returned to NJ where she teaches dance and works as a freelance artist throughout the metropolitan area.

Morgan Preston graduated from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University and has had the privilege of performing works by Danielle Agami, Merce Cunningham, Randy James, and Beniot-Swan Pouffer.  Morgan is also a member of LatticeWorks Dance, and Molly Galbraith & Dancers. She currently teaches dance, tumbling, yoga and choreographs throughout the New York metropolitan area.

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HATCH The Presenting Series
hatch

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00

Tickets $15

 Purchase Tickets Here!

Meet the Choreographer — Amy Jordan

Meet the Choreographer — Amy Jordan

 

Jordan directing

This weekend, The Works is hosting another evening of the HATCH Presenting Series!  There are only two series left this season, so be sure to be sure to stop by!

Amy Jordan will be presenting a solo work this weekend, danced by Kara Zacconi, titled “Awakening” to the HATCH audiences this Saturday, May 17 at 8pm at the Works Studio!

You can learn about Amy’s choreographic process and Kara’s dance history below! Be sure to stick around after the performance for a Q+A with all of the choreographers!

 

Questions for the Choreographer:

Why is is helpful to present a work in progress?  Presenting works in progress is an amazing benefit.  It forces me as choreographer to stop talking about creating work and actually start creating work.  A works in progress also allows for development of a concept that can be grown into a bigger work.  Having an opportunity to present pieces of a work is extremely beneficial towards creating a full contemporary piece.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?  Having strong technique is of course important but I am always looking for dancers with that extra spark.  Generally I find if people are spiritually grounded and have had more life and professional experience they are better able to connect to the work emotionally.  I have no time or energy for divas.  Unity of a company is the single most important factor towards a successful performance for the dancers and the audience.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to NYC audience?  This work was originally danced for the memorial of a 27 year old young man who was killed in a motorcycle accident.  Its rebirth is even more significant now.  It is the first work I am presenting after I was run over by a bus in 2009.  It was said I would never walk yet dance again.  The power of movement transcends everything.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?  The HATCH audience should look forward to a journey of self empowerment and human revolution.  I hope they are filled with courage and moved to take action towards goals and dreams perhaps they once  thought impossible.

 

Choreographer Bio:

As coach, trainer, motivator, producer and choreographer, Ms Jordan inspires people to live their highest Life Condition.

Amy deems herself a ‘professional survivor.’ She is not one to be taken down by adversity.Amy Jordan

Her professional dance background spans over three decades. She studied with Masters’
including choreographers for such legends as Michael Jackson and pop icons Madonna and Janet Jackson. She is a renowned producer, director and choreographer.

In 2009, Amy Jordan was run over by a bus.

The accident nearly cost her life and limb. Jordan’s rehabilitation has been deemed “a miracle.” Her resolve to live and walk again is a testament to her focused committment to moving her own life ahead.

“It was my training as a dancer and athlete that got me through. I don’t think I would have survived it otherwise,” remarks Jordan.

“This accident and all its components has been the most grueling physical, emotional and spiritual challenge I have ever faced.” The Life Force in Motion Company is committed to exemplifying the power of movement and the human spirit. www.lifeforceinmotion.com

 

Dancer Bio:

Kara kara zacconi head shot 2Zacconi trained at Orlando Ballet under the late Fernando Bujones. After graduating from OBT, she was  accepted into Florida State Univeristy’s Dance program where she studied under Dan Wagner,Jawole Zollar, and Gerri Houlihan.  Kara graduated Deans List with a BFA in Dance Performance in December 2008. Upon arrival to  NYC, Kara trained at the Martha Graham School on  scholarship and currently trains at Broadway Dance Center.  Kara recently signed with JGD for commercials/TV. She is a K-3rd grade dance teacher at Ps. 112 with Union  Settlement and is a freelance professional dancer.

 

 

HATCH The Presenting Series
hatch

Saturday, May 17th, 2014

 

131 W 24th St. 4th Floor

New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
, Show begins at 8:00

Tickets $15

 

Purchase Tickets Here