Meet the Choreographer – Cecilia Daninthe

Cecilia_Daninthe_Dallas - Mark Watts Photography

 

Meet The Choreographers – Cecilia Daninthe

Each Spring Jennifer Muller / The Works welcomes choreographers to present a work in progress as part of the HATCH presenting series.  Artistic Director of CeDan Dance Company, Cecilia Daninthe presents “Phase X” to HATCH audiences today, April 19th at The Works Studio in Chelsea.

CeDan Dance Company is a New York based professional contemporary dance company founded in 2014 and under the artistic direction of Cécilia Daninthe. The Company represents a diverse group of dancers with multi-cultural backgrounds who seek to shed light on issues within the world, and use contemporary movement to explore human behavior. The choreographic language and body movement is a blend of Jazz, Contemporary, Modern, Gwo’Ka and other traditional Caribbean dances, which creates a unique repertory.

Read on to learn more about Cecilia’s dance background and her interest in presenting a work in progress as part of the HATCH choreography series.  Meet Cecilia after the performances during the Q & A following the HATCH performances and learn more about her inspiration in creating “Phase X.”

Questions for the Choreographer

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?
It is helpful to present a work in progress to get insights, thoughts and feedback from people who are not involved with the piece or the company. As a choreographer I want to stay open to the idea of change because there are always ways to improve a work, and presenting Phase X at HATCH will hopefully allow it to develop further.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?
I really love working with dancers who understand really quick what my idea is, but also add their own personality and interpretation, which gives me room to create choreography based on these personalities and qualities. I also likedancers who are involved with other art forms and are honest enough to tell me what they really think about the choreography.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?
Performing Phase X in NYC is important to the growth of  CeDanDanceCompany as this is our first creation. I believe New Yorkers are really exposed and receptive to Art so this is an opportunity for feedback for developing this piece and that’s why I’m really looking forward to presenting Phase X at HATCH.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?
I do believe Phase X is a powerful and emotional piece which displays the strength and vulnerability of four different individuals, who are sharing the same fight. HATCH audiences should look forward to seeing this work because of the style of the choreography, which is a blend of Contemporary, Modern and Traditional Dances from the Caribbean and also because of those four amazing dancers who will transport them in a journey.

Cecilia Daninthe (21)

Choreographer Bio

 Cecilia Daninthe is a native of Guadeloupe (Caribbean) where she received her DE (equivalent to Master‘s degree in dance education) to teach Jazz Dance. After graduating from the Center of Dance and Choreographic Studies, she went on to being a featured artist with Compagnie Entre-Deux and joined the French musical “La Rue Zabym”. In 2007 she joined Compagnie Trilogie Léna Blou, where she is still invited to perform as a guest artist. Cécilia then moved to New York to study at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. After graduation she joined Rod Rodgers Dance Company as a Soloist and is currently in their Teaching Faculty in Jazz and Modern. Her career as a dance educationist has brought her to teach extensively in New York, the Caribbean and Europe. Ms. Daninthe’s choreography has also been gaining recognition in New York City and Europe by presenting her own work through many festivals and by producing her own full-evening length concerts. Her career has travelled her across the United States, Europe, and the Caribbean. Ms. Daninthe has amassed credits in musicals, music videos, and documentaries. She is a recipient of the Best Dance Artist Award of the Black Genius Festival 2013, Paris.

Dancer Bios

Fanny Delbrel Born and raised in France, Fanny has always been dancing. She first began dancing at Conservatory in her city. Later, she left for Paris to continue her training at the International Center of Jazz Dance, the Rick Odums’ Institute. After graduation she decided to fly to New York after having been accepted at the Alvin Ailey School. Her versatile training has allowed Fanny to learn a various range of dance techniques, such as Horton and Graham.

Anna Maria Johannes was born in 1990 close to Munich, Germany. Between the ages of 5-18 years she passed all of the R.A.D. (Royal Academy of Dance) examinations with the highest result “distinction”. In 2012 she graduated with a master as a professional contemporary dancer by “CobosMika Company” in Barcelona. Before that she trained with “Iwanson International” in Munich and “Danseuddannelsen” in Copenhagen. That same year she received an important culture award for “excellent achievements in contemporary dance” and soon after she got her first job as a dancer, choreographer, teacher and show manager in a big luxury hotel in Scuol, Switzerland. Since January she lives in New York City to carry on with intensive training in order to improve her dancing skills and continue working on her professional dancing career.

Marissa Nigro is a graduate from The New School and holds a BA in Dance. She has had the opportunity to perform works by Karla Wolfangle, Take Ueyama, Joao Carvalho, Ana Sokolow, Ori Flomin, and the Trisha Brown Dance Company. She has performed with Community Dance Project, Psychosomatic Dance Collective, and Long Island Dance Project. She has performed in venues such as Ailey Citigroup Theater, Cap21 Studios, Genesis Dance Showcase, AUPAC, and the Kids Cafe Festival. Currently she is working with Michelle DuVall Dance Collective and is thrilled to begin working with Cecilia Daninthe.

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HATCH The Presenting Series
Saturday, April 19th 2014
131 W 24th St. 4th Floor
New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
Show begins at 8:00

Tickets $15

Purchase Tickets Here

 

Meet the Choreographers – Jillian Davis

JDavis Gabby Shoot

HATCH spotlight – Jillian Davis

Jillian Davis Dance Project

Each Spring Jennifer Muller / The Works welcomes choreographers to present a work in progress as part of the HATCH presenting series.  Artistic Director of Jillian Davis Dance Project, Jillian Davis presents “Tiel” to HATCH audiences this April 19th at The Works Studio in Chelsea.

“Tiel” is a new dance piece choreographed by Jillian and will be danced by Nadine Azoulay, Laura Anne DeLaurentis, Steven Jeudy, Holly Mitchell, Jon Priester, Logan Scharadin, and Jillian Davis.

Read on to learn more about Jillian’s dance background and his interest in presenting a work in progress as part of the HATCH choreography series.  For a chance to meet Jillian and learn more about her information in creating “Tiel,” stay after the performance for a Q & A led by Jennifer Muller.

Choreographer Questions

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?
As a newer choreographer, presenting a work-in-progress allows me to get feedback from viewers that I can put directly into the work I am creating as well as future works.  Because the audience can give feedback on what they see, it gives me the opportunity to step into their shoes and see what they see what they see. Also, it is a chance for me to see if my piece is reaching the audience in the way I intend for it to or if they react to it differently.  Since choreographers usually have an idea, intention, or story they work with.  It is interesting for us to see how the audience interprets it.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?
The dancers I am fortunate enough to work with now are all committed, open-minded, and willing.  When there is a kind of “mental flexibility” to work with, it helps me as a choreographer to create something and still allow the dancers to put their own individual touch to it.  It also creates a great, creative atmosphere for everyone to work in.  We all have such a great time in rehearsals, no matter if I am creating new material that day or cleaning sections, and it makes me more excited to come into rehearsal the next time to see what happens.

Why is it important to present this work to audiences in NYC?
NYC audiences are known to be some of the most cultured, diverse, honest, and knowledgeable audiences in the country, if not the world.  To be given an opportunity to show this work to even a small portion of the “audience community” is a great privilege and can be both eye-opening and rewarding.  I am very interested to see their reaction to my work and what they have to say.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?
The movement and patterns created in this piece are directly in response to what they audience hears in the music.  From the beginning, there is a physical presence established by the dancers.  The undertones and overtones in the music are constantly shown through the piece by the dancers through trios, duets, solos, and ensemble work.  The pace and duration of each section depends on the percussion being played and the “layers” being presented at the moment.

Choreographer’s Biography

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Jillian Davis (Choreographer and Dancer)
Director and Choreographer Jillian Davis is from rural roots in Kutztown, PA, where her parents placed her in dance classes starting at age 3.  Discovering a love of ballet immediately and being recognized for her talent at an early age, teachers and mentors lead her to more serious ballet training.  Jillian was lucky enough to study at some of the country’s most prestigious ballet schools, including Pacific Northwest Ballet, Lines Ballet, School of American Ballet, and San Francisco Ballet. After expressing her continued interest in choreography while dancing in San Francisco, director Frederick Gaudette, whom she was working with, asked her to create a piece on a member of the company. Fluid Interference was premiered in August 2012, establishing Jillian’s unique style and showing how she works directly with the music. After her choreographic premiere, Jillian was asked to create a piece at her former studio, Princeton Dance and Theater Studio, for a talented student competing in YAGP. She was also asked to be a guest artist and choreographer at Missouri Valley College for the 2013-2014 school year. City Living (remix) was shown at the school’s spring performance February 2014.  Jillian decided to start JillianDavis Dance Project (JDDP) when she was selected as a finalist at Rider University’s Emerging Choreographers Competition, where she presented her newest ensemble work, Tiel. She aims to continue creating new works and also allow dancers interested in their own choreography to explore their thoughts and possibilities.

Dancer Bios

Nadine Azoulay (Dancer)
Nadine Azoulay began studying dance at 3 1/2 years old, starting at The School of Dance in Ottowa, Canada.  While in Canada, she had the opportunity to perform with Royal Winnepeg Ballet in galas in honor of Celia Franca, as well as their productions Romeo and Juliet, The Nutcracker, and The Fairy Queen. She continued her studies in the Netherlands, where she studied contemporary dance at Royal Netherlands Conservatory in The Hauge and HAVO for dance and music.  Returning to the United States, Nadine was a part of Washington Ballet’s Release Time training program and also had the opportunity to perform in Stephen Weber’s Romeo and Juliet and The Nutcracker.  She continued her studies at Virginia Commonwealth University for a BFA in Dance and Choreography.  Nadine performed at VCU Dance Now shows, MOVE by Chris Burnside, soloist roles in the Student Concerts, and many Salon Showings.  She was also a member of Latin Ballet of Virginia, where she performed in El Dorado, Mujeres, Carnaval, NuYoRican, Baile y Rumba, and the Legend of Poinsettia.  Nadine has also created her own choreography, which has been presented at a VCU concert for her senior project, Balasole Dance, Baryshnikov Arts Center, NACHMO, Wire Arts LIVE Festival, and many more.  She is also a current member of The Pink Tutu Ballet, where she directs rehearsals and performs.  Nadine is an original member of Jillian Davis Dance Project.

Laura Anne DeLaurentis (Dancer)
Laura started her dancing career at the age of 8 at the Stamford Academy of Ballet.  Though taking a hiatus from dancing until the age of 15, she went on to achieve a professional ballroom title in the International Latin and Standard at the age of 17.  She competed nationally at the high rank of S class dancer and was awarded 2nd place as a 10 Dance Champion. Soon afterworkds, she was offered the Trustee’s Scholarship for rare talent in artistry to attend Dean College’s Dance program and completed a full certification as a personal trainer.  During her college years, Laura also studied with the Casa Patas Flamenco Conservatory and performed with them in Madrid, Spain.  She graduated Dean in 2011 with a B.A. in Dance and a minor in Psycology.  Her study in dance has continued with Complexions, Spellbound Contemporary Ballet, Armitage Gone!, Cedar Lake, Emery LeCrone, Helen Pickett, and New Chamber Ballet.  Her performances include works by Miro Chaglione, Alexandre Proia, Stuart Loungway, and Jennifer Muller.  She is currently and apprentice/scholarship student with Jennifer Muller/The Works and is also freelancing with multiple artists dancing on film.  Laura is an original member of Jillian Davis Dance Project.

Steven Jeudy (Dancer)
Steven Jeudy began his dance education at the age of 18, as a member of The Cleo Parker Robinson Training Group in Denver, Colorado in 2005.  After receiving the much needed push, he auditioned and was accepted into The Ailey School Certificate Program later that year.  Steven has attended the Alonzo King LINES Ballet summer program and the Ear Mosley Institue for the Arts on full scholarship.  Upon graduation from The Ailey School in 2009, Steven became a full time company member for Florida Dance Theater in Lakeland, FL, where he was a principal dancer from 2009-2011.  Steven has performed many works by Cleo Parker Robinson, Milton Meyers, Earl Mosley, Christopher Huggins, Camille A. Brown, and Carmen Rozestraten of Alonzo Kind LINES Ballet.  Steven is one of the original members of Jillian Davis Dance Project.

Holly Mitchell (Dancer)
Holly Mitchell was born in the city of Vancouver, Canada. She began her early training at age 8 where she worked under Astrid Sherman. Upon moving to New York City, she attended the dance conservatory program at SUNY Purchase College and graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in dance in 2013.  Throughout her dance career, she has performed the works of Beverly Bagg, Jessica Lang, Claire Porter, Astrid Sherman and has explored dance through photography and film through collaborative efforts.  Holly is one of the original members of Jillian Davis Dance Project.

Jon Priester (Dancer)

Jonathan Priester was born in Brooklyn N.Y. His first taste of dance was creative movement classes at an early age.  He took his first ballet class in high school where his teachers saw enough latent talent to help him persue dance professionally.  At the University of the Arts, Jonathan was trained under the direction of Andrew Pap with the tutelage of such prominent teachers as Christine Cox, Michael Sheridan, Eva Szabo, Scott Jovovich, Zane Booker, Anastasia Babayeva, Denis Gronostayskiy, Kimberly Bears-Bailey, Jennifer Binford-Johnson and countless others.  In his professional career, Jonathan had work such wonderful choreographers as Sidra Bell, Igal Perry, Michele Oliva, and Leo Mujic.  He is currently freelancing around the Tri-State area and is one of the original members of Jillian Davis Dance Project.

Logan Scharadin (Dancer)
Logan Scharadin is a native of Pennsylvania who began her dance training at the Pennsylvania Youth Ballet under the instruction of Oleg Briansky and Karen Knerr. She then continued her education in dance at both Walnut Hill and the Lehigh Valley Charter High School for the Performing Arts. From there Logan majored in dance performance at SUNY Purchase and graduated with a BFA in May of 2013. She also had the privilege to study dance in Spain at the Conservatorio de Danza in Madrid as well as in China at the Beijing Dance Academy.  She is currently dancing with Azul Dance Theater and is an original member of Jillian Davis Dance Project.

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Purchase Tickets Here

HATCH The Presenting Series
held at The Works Studio
131 W. 24th St. 4th Floor
New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
Show begins at 8:00
Tickets $15

HATCH spotlight – Daniel Flores Dance

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Meet the Choreographers- Daniel Flores

Each Spring Jennifer Muller / The Works welcomes choreographers to present a work in progress as part of the HATCH presenting series.  Artistic Director of Daniel Flores Dance, Daniel Flores presents “marcha atraz” to HATCH audiences this April 19th at The Works Studio in Chelsea.

“marcha atraz” is a new dance piece choreographed by Daniel and made possible by The Field’s 2013 Emerging Artist Residency program supported by the Lambent Foundation.  The piece will be danced by Danielle Atkinson, Ellyn Sjoquist, and Morgan Hille Refakis.

Read on to learn more about Daniel’s dance background and his interest in presenting a work in progress as part of the HATCH choreography series.  Meet Daniel after the performances during the Q & A following the HATCH performances and learn more about his inspiration in creating “marcha atraz.”

Choreographer’s Questions

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?
A work in progress showing allows the work to breathe on its own, revealing its strengths and weaknesses. The choreographer/director can then steer its development into a more interesting path.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?
Possessing a diverse choreographic aesthetic, I feel most fortunate to work with dancers that can maintain a strong sense of self throughout an evolving creative process, from learning specific movements to developing their own through improvisation. I’m truly inspired by dancers that can express their individual humanity above all of their training because ultimately, those are the kind of dancers that I enjoy watching the most.

Why is it important to present this work to audiences in NYC?
In this work, there’s a conscious effort to blur the dual roles of performers as spectators, which works best in the intimate venues abundant to NYC.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?
One of my favorite elements in my resent work, and particularly in marcha atraz, is observing completely different performers create a unique environment in which they can coexist and relate.

Choreographer Bio

Daniel

Daniel Flores A native of San Diego, Daniel sites his personal struggle with cultural identity (which was intensified by being raised on both sides of the US-Mexican border) as the catalyst that propelled him to begin creating significant work. He relocated to NYC in early 2011, and by the fall of 2012 he was ready to reshape DFD and create new, collaborative work. Since then, his work has been showcased at various venues and events throughout NYC, including the inaugural Dance for DNA Festival, Dance Conversations @ The Flea Festival, Fertile Ground Series, 2013 YOUR MOVE Modern Dance Festival, and at Movement Research Open Performance Series, among others. In the spring of 2013, he presented DFD’s first, full-evening concert in NYC, Reimagined in Movement. In the fall of 2013, through a choreographic residency at Southwestern College in San Diego, he created and premiered Nomansland, a new work in which he revisited the varied dynamics and atmosphere while waiting to cross the international border. More recently, Daniel took part in The Field’s 2013 Emerging Artist Residency program, culminating with a performance at Abron’s Arts Center.

Dancer Bios

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Danielle Atkinson Born and raised in the United Kingdom, Danielle obtained her BA (Hons) Contemporary Dance degree in Newcastle-Upon -Tyne, North East of England, graduating in June 2012. While in Newcastle, she worked with several contemporary dance companies, including Lo Giudice Dance, Appetite Dance, and Shaun Boyle & Artists. This gave her the opportunity to perform both regionally and nationally around the UK in full-length dance pieces and festivals. Danielle came to New York in September 2012 to study on the Limon Professional Studies Program. Following her graduation she was invited to join Humanistic Dance, and Dance Visions New York. As an artist, Danielle is passionate about exploring movement vocabulary and work that challenges the body both physically and psychologically. “You can’t hide away from life, so why not use every experience to enhance the way the body moves?”

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Ellyn Sjoquist, a native of Southern Illinois, inexplicably found herself at The University of Akron in Northeast Ohio, where she earned a BFA in Dance with a concentration in news and media production. En route to that degree, she worked with some lovely artists and companies including Taylor 2, Keigwin + Company, Momix, Alexandra Beller and Steven McMahon. She also toured Ohio and Pennsylvania as a founding member of Pas de Monkéy Dance Project, a band of unscrupulous dancing bodies under the direction of Robin Prichard. As a choreographer, her work has been presented at American College Dance Festival and American Dance Festival. Currently based in Queens, Ellyn works in marketing and programming for Doug Varone and Dancers, as co-producer at Williamsburg Arts neXus, and as a freelance proofreader for whomever will tolerate her grammatical preferences.

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Morgan Hille Refakis is a dancer and choreographer from Fort Wayne, Indiana. She has degrees in dance and journalism from Rutgers University, where she received a Jerome and Lorraine Aresty Research Scholarship for choreography. Morgan has taught dance in France and studied choreography with Ballet Prelocaj at Pavillon Noir in Aix-en-Provence. She was a member Mikautadze Dance Theatre in Fort Wayne. Representing northeast Indiana, she traveled to Mexico on a Performing Arts Cultural Exchange with Rotary International. Morgan performed and studied with the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange and worked with the company to develop How To Lose a Mountain. In addition, Morgan has studied with Carolyn Dorfman, Randy James, Julia Ritter, Cassie Meador and Paulette Sears. She has also performed and studied with Lees Hummel, David Dorfman, Meagan Woods and Company, Isabel Lewis, and Insurgo Stage Project. Currently, Morgan is co-producer of Your Move: Jersey City’s Modern Dance Festival, a member of Daniel Flores Dance, and is a certified Pilates instructor.

hatchPurchase Tickets Here

HATCH Presenting Series
held at The Works Studio
131 W 24th St.
New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
Show begins at 8:00
Tickets $15

HATCH spotlight – LoBrace Dance Works

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Meet The Choreographers – Michelle LoBrace

The second series of the spring 2014 HATCH is quickly approaching!  Six choreographers will be showing works, including the artistic director of LoBrace DanceWorks, Michelle LoBrace.  LoBrace’s dance company will be presenting “Encounters” to HATCH audiences this Saturday April 19th, at The Works Studio in Chelsea.

“Encounters” began with three different inspirations – music, breaking social norms, and real life experience.  It is a duet, originally choreographed for two males, has also been presented at Joy of Motion Dance Center’s Dance Project.

Read on to learn more about Michelle’s dance background and her interest in presenting a work in progress as part of the HATCH choreography series.  Meet Michelle after the performances during the Q & A following the HATCH performances and learn more about her inspiration in creating “Encounters.”

Choreographer’s Questions

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?
It’s helpful to present a work in progress so you can see how the audience reacts to what you have created so far. I have shown a work in progress piece and it’s very helpful when audience members leave feedback on what they liked, didn’t understand or what they wanted to see more of throughout the excerpt. We create dances for our own personal enjoyment but we want the audience to keep coming back.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?
The most rewarding types of dancers are the ones who literally love to dance. I have come across a lot of dancers pursuing degrees that don’t take training seriously, not saying dance can’t be fun and serious, but the dancers who are most rewarding are the ones who basically eat, sleep and breathe dance as a hobby and career. They are focused in rehearsals and want to get corrections to better themselves as dancers. These sorts of dancers will make it in the business and I’ve had the pleasure of working with a handful of them.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to NYC audiences?
It’s important to show my duet, Encounters, to audiences in New York City so I can continue to show my work for different audiences and make a name for myself as a choreographer.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?
HATCH audiences should look forward to seeing two dancers of the same sex dancing together as friends who have each other’s backs.

Choreographer Bio

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Michelle LoBrace began her dance training at the New Jersey School of Ballet, Ballet Forte directed by Andrea Kramer and New Jersey Dance Theater Ensemble, directed by Nancy Turano. In high school, LoBrace went to Somerset County Vocational High School part time and studied dance with Sheila Buttermore and Maureen Glennon. Michelle graduated from Shenandoah Conservatory with a BFA in Dance, in August 2013 and trained with and performed pieces by multiple faculty members, as well as being a rehearsal assistant. Michelle has also participated in the Parsons Dance Choreography Intensive for two consecutive summers. In December 2012, LoBrace premiered a work, How Small, in the showcase series, “Dance Project,” at the Joy of Motion Dance Center in Washington, D.C. How Small was also showcased in Winchester, Virginia, and in New York City for NYC10 Dance Initiative and the 8th Amalgamate Artist Series.  How Small was a part of the Emerging Choreographer’s Competition at Rider University in January 2014. Encounters, Michelle’s newest work, was shown at Joy of Motion Dance Center’s Dance Project in Washington DC, The 9th Amalgamate Artist Series, and the NYC Dance Arts Festival both in NYC. For Michelle’s latest project, she is setting a new work on the students of Ballet Forte that will be performed June 11, 2014 at the Bickford Theatre in Morristown, NJ.

hatch

PURCHASE TICKETS HERE
HATCH Presenting Series
held at The Works Studio
131 W 24th St.
New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
Show begins at 8:00
Tickets $15

Meet the Choreographers – Macy Sullivan

 

HATCH spotlight – Macy Sullivan

This weekend, The Works will be hosting the second series of the spring 2014 HATCH showing.  If you didn’t have the opportunity to check out the previous performances, we would love to see you come out!  This week we will be featuring 6 choreographers including today’s girl in the HATCH spotlight, Macy Sullivan.

Macy is a New York City based dancer and Julliard graduate.  She has trained and taught in many different styles including – modern, ballet, jazz, tap, and lindy hop. Macy will present her work in progress of a new solo in the HATCH presenting series on April 19th.

Questions for the Choreographer –

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?
Particularly for my self-choreographed solos, work-in-progress showings allow me to turn off the “choreography” side of my brain and focus on the performance aspect, which is important because I learn different things working from a different point of view. Often times, when I focus on performing the solo I’m choreographing, tricky sections seem to resolve organically because I can feel the momentum of the piece and better understand where it needs to go.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?
I had the pleasure of creating a tap duet that I performed with a dear friend, Caleb Teicher. Other than Caleb, my collaborators have been musicians and actors. What a joy it is to work them! I’ve been fortunate to work with jazz composers, Kyle Athayde and Samora Pinderhughes, and more recently, actor Kerry Warren. Their questions, insights, and perspectives are so unique and force me to think about my process in new ways. And of course, working with such talented artists is in itself a treat!

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to NYC audiences?
In February, I taught in the Cayman Islands. Most of the students were not trained dancers but rather public school kids who took a dance elective. They didn’t know a flexed foot from a pointed foot, but THEY COULD DANCE. 8 year olds! They knew what it meant to create a jam circle, take turns and express themselves with moves they learned from each other or made up. That would never happen in NYC! I was left with a plethora of questions that I wanted to explore within this solo.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?
Great music! Short-and-sweet! More to come!!!!

 

Dancer Bio

4461966Macy Sullivan currently dances with The Chase Brock Experience and Dance Heginbotham in NYC.  She recently performed the roles of Peter in Isaac Mizrahi’s Peter and the Wolf, Marie in Chase Brock’s The Nutcracker, and a featured tap dancer in Tyne Rafaeli’s production of The Poor of New York. Sullivan has also performed work by Alexander Ekman, Merce Cunningham, Mark Morris, Ohad Naharin, José Limón, Ray Hesselink, Alexander Weinman, Caleb Teicher, George Balanchine, August Bournonville, and Christopher Stowell.  Sullivan is a recipient of the Martha Hill Prize, John Erskine Prize, and Choreographic Honors from The Juilliard School (BFA Dance).www.macysullivan.com

 Purchase tickets here

hatch

 

HATCH presenting series

held at the Works Studio
131 W 24th St. (between 6th & 7th ave.)
New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
Show begins at 8:00

Tickets $15

 

Meet the Choreographers – Eric Williams

HATCHericwilliams1HATCH spotlight – Eric Williams

Last weekend The Works was filled with HATCH presenters and audience members for our first presenting series of Spring 2014.  The show featured 6 choreographers, who all did a great job and presented a wide variety of material. We are looking forward to another successful showing April 19th.

Today we would like to introduce The Works alumni, Eric Williams.  Eric has trained and danced with us in the past and is now a HATCH presenter.  We look forward to seeing Eric’s artistic eye in motion in his piece titled Tribal Seeds.  Read on to learn more.

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?
Perfection is an ideal. Even finished pieces undergo change and evolve with performance. Presenting a work in progress provides an opportunity for the work to undergo the rigors of performance. The difference in performer energy and dynamic, the audience reaction, the various ebbs and flow of the work are all tested and thus provide the choreographer with valuable information. With that information the choreographer can continue moving forward towards a more efficient and cohesive end product.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?
For me the most rewarding dancers are those who can balance. They can balance their own identities as artist while committing to a choreographer’s vision. They know how to take risks, provide insight and offer alternatives while adhering to a common goal.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?
NYC is my home, both figuratively and artistically. As a young choreographer the field can seem epically large, clouded and daunting. But tackling those elements, defining ones personal style and sharing with dance enthusiast here is a reward nearly unrivaled for a dancer.

What should HATCH audiences look forward to in your work?
I hope to create a work that is both entertaining and enlightening. I’d like for HATCH audiences to look into my work and find a piece of themselves, or a question they hadn’t yet considered, or even just a moment of simple pleasure!

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Dancer Bio

Eric Williams is a body expresser, a movement shaper and a mind melded. After his professional studies at the HARID Conservatory and the University of South Florida his journey brought him to New York. Here he had the great pleasure and privilege of working with such artists as Jennifer Muller/ The Works, the Trisha Brown Dance Company, and Kyle Abraham: Abraham.In Morion. As an architect of movement and context, Eric hopes to present work that is both inquisitive and cathartic. Enjoy!

Come to HATCH to see Eric Williams perform!

Purchase tickets here

hatch

HATCH presenting series
held at the Works Studio
131 W 24th St. (between 6th & 7th ave.)
New York, NY 10011

Doors open at 7:30
Show begins at 8:00

Tickets $15

Meet the Choreographers – Susie Thiel

HATCH spotlight: Susie Thiel

We at Jennifer Muller The Works are extremely excited for our first series of HATCH performances opening tomorrow night!  In today’s artist spotlight is Susie Thiel.  Susie currently resides in Lexington, Kentucky where she serves as the director and assistant professor of the dance program at the University of Kentucky.  She will be presenting a solo titled “Her Tether to the Outside World.”

Choreographer’s Questions

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

I am committed to the creation of unique dance theater performance that stimulates the audience on a variety of levels. As a choreographer I want to impart a connection to my audience in the form of emotion, narrative and the known and unknown. However, my work is open enough for the viewers to find their own meaning and interpretations. A works in progress showing is helpful as it is a way to see what connections are being made and how the audience is interested and stimulated by the dance work.

Who are you the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

This is a solo work, however I am drawn to dancers that are open to experiment and collaborate and that are willing to push the boundaries.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

I believe NYC audiences have seen so much art, theatre and visual arts and they are open to so much. They come to feedback sessions with a unique, knowledgeable and developed perspective.

What should HATCH look forward to with your presentation?

Multiple layers of “performativity” tell this story as various selves relate to, examine and come to terms with the past. Identity, reality and illusion make it difficult to decipher whether the events are actually taking place, have happened or are merely in the soloist mind. I believe this work will keep the audience questioning, wondering and searching for the character’s true story.

Dance Background

Susie Thiel is a multi-media artist, choreographer, performer, and educator.  She is the director of the Dance Program and Assistant Professor of Theatre at the University of Kentucky.  She also is the Artistic Director of Susie Thiel Collaborative, a dance theatre company established in 2012.  She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Western Michigan University and her Master of Fine Arts in Dance from the University of Michigan.  She has performed with several modern dance companies, including the New York Dance Collective, Genesis Dance Company, Sharon Fogarty Dance Theatre and Impulse Initiative.  Her choreography has been produced nationally and internationally.  Visit her at http://www.susiethiel.com

Come out to see Susie Thiel perform at HATCH

     

      BUY TICKETS HERE

  • The Works Studio is located at 131 West 24th Street, 4th Floor (between 6th and 7th Avenue), in NYC.
  • Doors at 6:30.
  • Show begins at 7:00 pm.
  • Tickets $15

Meet the Choreographers – Jessica DiMauro

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Photo credit: Bill Bramswig

HATCH spotlight: Jessica DiMauro

HATCH presenting series is excited to welcome artist Jessica DiMauro back to The Works this Saturday, April 5th.  This spring DiMauro presents Disarrange to HATCH audiences.  The piece features DiMauro herself and Francesca Perini, member of the DiMauro Dance Company.

Disarrange is a chance dance of sorts.  The piece will utilize audience participation to determine performance order.

A chance dance, or chance operation, is a technique coined by dance legend Merce Cunningham.  In this technique the dancers, music, and lighting operations would come together for the first time on the day of the show!

Come to HATCH this weekend for a chance to meet Jessica and learn more about the technique and inspiration at the Q & A following the performance.

Choreographer’s Questions

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

When rehearsing for a showing of a work in progress, the focus is on the process not final product. It is extremely liberating to not feel the need to have the work be a final statement, but rather, an ongoing conversation, by exploring new ideas without concern for such finality.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

The most interesting dancers to work with are those who can absorb material quickly, digest it, and begin to explore my movement as their own. I don’t want to work with dancers that play “Simon Says,” repeating exactly what I do. I want dancers who experience movement, taking dynamic and emotional risks within it.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

This work is part of a larger conversation I am working on and requires active participation by the audience. NYC is the best place to find an invested, participatory audience!

What should HATCH look forward to with your presentation?

Physicality, inquiry and the experimentation of shedding theatrical norms.

Dance Background

Photo credit: Francesca Perini

Jessica DiMauro holds a BFA in Dance from Marymount Manhattan College and is currently pursuing her MFA in Choreography at Jacksonville University. Ms. DiMauro’s company, DiMauro Dance, has been selected to perform at festivals including Dance Conversations at The Flea, WHITE WAVE’s WAVE RISING Series, COOL NY and DUMBO Dance Festivals, The T: Dance, Watch, Reflect, Greenspace Blooms, The HATCH presenting series, CT Meets NY, Queens Arts Express and New Dance Downtown. Ms. DiMauro was given an Arts Alive Artist Grant from ArtsWestchester for her work entitled com-mu-ni-ty. DiMauro Dance also performed as the Guest Artists for the 2009 Annual Benefit for The Steffi Nossen School of Dance and The Dance in Education Fund where Jessica acted as Artistic Director and Producer for the years 2011-12. In addition, Ms. DiMauro produced Unraveled at the Merce Cunningham Studio in April of 2011, Confetti: A Collection of Works by Jessica DiMauro at The Producers’ Club Theaters and her choreography was also seen at the 2004 International NYC Fringe Festival in Granola! The Musical at The Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts. William Stevenson of Broadway.com describes Jessica as “a promising young talent,” and her choreography for Granola! as “often hilarious”. In the Spring of 2013, Jessica will set her tenth work on the BFA Dance students at Montclair State University where she is on faculty as a professor of Modern Technique. This past academic year at MSU she served as Rehearsal Director for the staging of Martha Graham’s Daughters of the Night; the Chorus from Night Journey, which was performed at the Joyce Theater in February 2013. This year she is honored to act as Rehearsal Director for Bill T. Jones’ work Spent Days Out Yonder.  Jessica was among the first three students to be certified in May O’Donnell Technique in the summer of 2013. Ms. DiMauro is a Certified Kripalu Yoga Teacher, ACE-Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness Instructor. www.dimaurodance.com

Jessica DiMauro holds a BFA in Dance from Marymount Manhattan College and is currently pursuing her MFA in Choreography at Jacksonville University. Ms. DiMauro’s company, DiMauro Dance, has been selected to perform at numerous festivals throughout the tri-state area, including Dance Conversations at The Flea and WHITE WAVE’s WAVE RISING Series.  In the Spring of 2014, Jessica will set her tenth work on the BFA Dance students at Montclair State University where she is on faculty as a professor of Modern Technique. Jessica also teaches Modern Technique and Core Curriculum at at Steffi Nossen School of Dance. This year she is honored to act as the University’s Rehearsal Director for Bill T. Jones’ work Spent Days Out Yonder. Ms. DiMauro is a Certified May O’Donnell Technique teacher, Kripalu Yoga Teacher, ACE-Certified Personal Trainer and Group Fitness Instructor.www.dimaurodance.com

Francesca Perini graduated from Montclair State University in May of 2010 with a BFA in Dance, where she also received the Outstanding Performer Award for the 2009-2010 academic year. She has performed works by Wilson Mendieta, Nancy Lushington, Maxine Steinman, Pearl Primus, May O’Donnell, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham and Robert Battle. Francesca has been performing with DiMauro Dance since 2011.

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Come out to see Jessica DiMauro perform at HATCH

      BUY TICKETS HERE

  • The Works Studio is located at 131 West 24th Street, 4th Floor (between 6th and 7th Avenue), in NYC.
  • Doors at 6:30.
  • Show begins at 7:00 pm.
  • Tickets $15

Meet the Choreographers – Chloe Amos


Chloe Amos presents “Approach”

This weekend at The Works we are opening our doors for the first HATCH performance in the spring 2014 series!  Today’s artist in the spotlight Chloe Amos comes to us from Adelphi University to present her first piece out of high school.

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Choreographer’s Questions

Why is it helpful to present a work in progress?

Presenting a work in progress gives the choreographer the opportunity to get audience reactions to a piece during the creative process.  It is a chance for the choreographer to also test to the intimacy level of the piece, and determine whether the choreography allows for enough vulnerability to come through to the audience.

Who are the most rewarding dancers for you to work with and why?

The most rewarding dancers are the ones who pay attention to the specific details of choreography, but are also eager to add unique aspects of themselves and their personal movement to a piece when the choreographer wants them to.

Why is it important to present this piece of choreography to audiences in NYC?

This piece couples the essence of the raw nature of Earth along with the raw nature of being human.  City people can grow detached from that innate link between the physical world and the human experience.  This piece serves as a reminder that there is a connection between humans and nature.

What should HATCH look forward to with your presentation?

My work tends to be deeply rooted in an emotional concept. I am always looking for new ways to depict emotion and how it affects the human experience.  My work involves much self reflection.

Dancer Biography

Chloe Amos is currently a freshman dance major at Adelphi University.  She hails from Oahu, Hawaii where she grew up dancing at Applause! Performance Academy and Castle High School.  In the past she has choreographed for all of Castle High School’s dance concerts as well as a children’s show with Ohana Arts.  “Approach” is the first piece she has worked on since her senior year of high school.

Come out to see Chloe Amos perform at HATCH

hatch      BUY TICKETS HERE

  • The Works Studio is located at 131 West 24th Street, 4th Floor (between 6th and 7th Avenue), in NYC.
  • Doors at 6:30.
  • Show begins at 7:00 pm.
  • Tickets $15